Instant (agram) style for your living room

For those whose homes are distinctively retro in style, who have a Charles Eames chair in their lounge, Arne Jacobsen in their dining room and Pucci prints adorning their soft furnishings, then it can be difficult to find the right solution to display family photographs.

The sharp lines of modern digital photo frames just don’t seem to fit some how.

But those who love the 60s and 70s will probably have already fallen in love with Instagram, the photo-sharing site which turns your snaps into old-school Polaroid-like prints.

Now, the Instacube will allow you to not just share those pictures online, but to bring them into your home in a way which fits perfectly with your décor.

Instacube offers beautiful retro styling with its curved edges and subtle rainbow stripes on a dominant palette of black and silver, all combined with up-to-the-minute technology.

Just launched on Kickstarter by creators Design to Matter, the Instacube could help digital photo frames overcome the somewhat dated image they seem to have picked up of late.

With wireless, touchscreen and flash memory, it has everything you would expect from a digital photo frame, all packaged up to look like the Instagram app.

The designers are asking for $100 from their first 1,000 backers and $150 from everyone else. The display has been created to match the 600-square pixels size of Instagram photos and the Instacube toggles through different feeds depending on your settings. You can choose to display based on friends in the images or on hashtags. The frame runs on an Android-operating system so the developers among you will be able to play around with the system.

Amazingly, in just a few hours, Instacube had achieved 30% of its $250,000 goal. And, within a couple of days, it had hit the $200,000 mark, with 1,550 backers. It could mean Instacube becomes one of Kickstarter’s success stories. The funding platform has raised more than $323m for more than 10,000 projects over the past three years.

John Whaley, Design to Matter’s head of industrial design, says he was expecting good support, having polled community and social networks to gauge excitement before trying to gain funding. The company already offers services in design, engineering and production so has no qualms about delivering on its promises if it reaches its targets.

“This is why we wanted to do a project on Kickstarter, since we have all of these disciplines in house,” said Whaley. “We really believe we’re the perfect team to do this kind of project, because we can execute.

“Now, we’re still kind of crossing our fingers and refreshing the campaign every 30 seconds to see the numbers”, he added.

Already the idea has won rave reviews from business and gadget gurus who have described Instacube as “the next big thing for photo viewing” along with “hip” and “cool”.

With initial plaudits like that, Instacube should have no problem meeting its funding targets and getting to market. We look forward to it adorning our living room shelves.

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