eBay’s ticket website StubHub: Easy to use or overcomplicated?

Back in February we published an article about eBay’s new website Stubhub, touted as the place where fans can buy and sell tickets. The article focused on the way the site worked, how there were many buyer and seller guarantees in place and generally how easy it was to use.

StubHub an ebay company

However, I have to say that since I have attempted to use the site, I must report back on some glaring issues.

I had some time sensitive tickets to a World premiere event in London today (Sunday). The tickets were for the World War Z World Premier Performance Event, featuring Muse and to be held at the Horse Guards Parade in London. As I only managed to confirmation of the tickets on Friday, and found out that I could not go I was in a bit of a push to get them sold to another fan.

Force of habit saw me logging onto the eBay site and looking for a quick way of selling the tickets I did a search to see if anyone else had any up on the site. This way I could simply click got ‘Selling the same thing?’ and most of the work would already be done for me. Finding a couple of people who were selling their tickets to the event, I went through the process of selling mine, via the ‘same thing’ link. Most of the text had already been filled in, the event title, the place, etc etc

I wrote a little extra text and satisfied that I had covered all the main points I listed the tickets. A few hours later that day I checked back to see if there had been any interest, and as the tickets were to be emailed over to the buyer by me, I also wanted to make sure that if anyone had bought them, I would be able to send them immediately, due to the time sensitivity.

Imagine my surprise when instead of my listing, I found a message from eBay saying that the tickets had been removed because they no longer sell tickets on eBay and if I wanted to sell tickets I should have gone over to Stubhub, where all tickets are now sold.

How StubHub Works

I felt a little silly, I mean I had recently written an article about Stubhub so if anyone should have known that you couldn’t now sell tickets on eBay it should have been me. However, I began to wonder why eBay had not some measures in place that would have stopped me selling the tickets on their site in the first place. A simple software programme that searched for the word ‘tickets’ and came up with a warning such as ‘Are you attempting to sell tickets?: You need to sell them on our new site Stubhub’ would be ideal.

I had wasted a lot of time and as time was of the essence I went over to Stubhub and began to work out how to get these tickets up for sale.

Enter the event or the band it prompted me, so I entered the event – ‘No such event’, I entered the band, and around seven gig events came up in the search, but not my event in London. Wondering if I could simply add my event as you would do in eBay, I learned that unless Stubhub had the event listed, you could not sell tickets. There was an option for you to ‘request they add an event’ so I did that, expecting an immediate response, but no, they thanked me for recommending the event and would get back to me within a week. Hardly helpful as the event is being held today.

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So what have I learned from this experience that I can pass on to our readers? Well, selling tickets on eBay was an easy process, you simply listed them and got on with it. Selling on Stubhub has been made overcomplicated for no good reason. I do not understand why it is the site that enters the events and not the sellers. How can Stubhub possibly enter every single event that is being held around the world? And if they do not, you simply cannot sell your tickets. It’s a ridiculous set up that benefits neither the seller, buyer or the site.

Yes, some of their guarantees are good, but what is the point if you can’t sell?

If you have tried selling on Stubhub we’d like to hear from you. Perhaps we can change their policy!

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